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Arizona given $950,000 tax dollars to research Ants.

Recent reports from Senator Jon McCain on how tax paying dollars could be going to waste included a cool $950,000 given to the state of Arizona to research ants. The lucky ants are the turtle ant and the harvester ant. The money goes to ASU and U-of-A. Individuals argue that this money keeps scientist in Arizona which will be good for the recovering economy. Others complain that the ants are remaining employed while many in the state are not. A little further research reveals that the near million dollars supports a total of 3.5 jobs at the universities.

And yet the rasberry ant is causing major problems in Houston and south Texas. They short out stop lights, cause problems in water wells, displace local wild life, and shut down manufacturing plants. But oddly enough the University of Texas, who is currently doing research on the ever invasive Rasberry ant, doesn’t receive nearly the same amount to research this problematic Texas crazy ant…. and we call the ants crazy…

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December 10, 2009 at 5:35 pm
3 comments »
  • June 13, 2010 at 3:26 pmLong Beach pest control

    Pests like mites and aphids are not treatable using the handpicked method. However, larger pests such as scale insects and mealybugs can be removed simply by picking them off. This might not be the method of choice for those that are afraid of bugs. If you’re afraid of touching them, consider using a pair of tweezers or similar item. A small handheld vacuum can be helpful in removing whiteflies.

  • February 16, 2012 at 8:24 amSanta Fe Springs pest control

    All termites eat cellulose in its various forms as plant fibre. Cellulose is a rich energy source (as demonstrated by the amount of energy released when wood is burned), but remains difficult to digest. Termites rely primarily upon symbiotic protozoa (metamonads) such as Trichonympha, and other microbes in their gut to digest the cellulose for them and absorb the end products for their own use. Gut protozoa, such as Trichonympha, in turn rely on symbiotic bacteria embedded on their surfaces to produce some of the necessary digestive enzymes. This relationship is one of the finest examples of mutualism among animals. Most so-called higher termites, especially in the Family Termitidae, can produce their own cellulase enzymes. However, they still retain a rich gut fauna and primarily rely upon the bacteria. Owing to closely related bacterial species, it is strongly presumed that the termites’ gut flora are descended from the gut flora of the ancestral wood-eating cockroaches, like those of the genus Cryptocercus.


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